Data of a store keeper

As the storekeeper of the industrial site, data informs inventory levels and stock availability. Utilizing data analytics, they streamline supply chain processes, minimizing shortages and excess. Through data-driven management, the storekeeper ensures efficient operations and optimized resource allocation.

Categories: ,

Description

Meet Marlon

What data does a store keeper manage ?

A storekeeper typically has to manage a variety of data related to the operations of a store or warehouse. This can include:

  1. Inventory data: This includes information about the items that are in stock, such as the quantities of each item, the locations where they are stored, and their expiration dates (if applicable).
  2. Customer data: This can include contact information for customers, as well as information about their purchasing history and preferences.
  3. Sales data, about the products that have been sold, such as the quantities and prices of each item, as well as the date and time of the sale.
  4. Financial data: This can include data related to the store’s finances, such as sales revenues, expenses, and profits.
  5. Employee data, about the store’s employees, such as their names, job titles, and schedules.
  6. Supplier data: This includes information about the store’s suppliers, such as their contact information and the products they supply.

In addition to managing this data, a storekeeper may also be responsible for tracking and managing orders, preparing reports, and ensuring that the store is properly stocked and organized.

What risks ?

Operational risks for a storekeeper may include:

  1. Loss or damage to stock: This can occur due to various factors, such as poor handling or storage, accidents, or theft.
  2. Inaccurate or incomplete record-keeping: This can lead to problems with inventory management, as well as difficulties in tracking orders and fulfilling customer requests.
  3. Safety hazards: A storekeeper may be at risk of injury if they are handling heavy or hazardous materials, or if safety procedures are not followed properly.
  4. Customer service issues: A storekeeper may face challenges in dealing with difficult or unhappy customers, or in handling complaints or disputes.
  5. Data security risks: A storekeeper may be responsible for handling sensitive customer or company data, and may need to ensure that this data is properly protected from unauthorized access or breaches.
  6. Legal and regulatory compliance: A storekeeper must ensure that the store or warehouse complies with relevant laws and regulations, including those related to safety, health, and environmental protection.
  7. IT system failures: A storekeeper may rely on computer systems and other technologies to manage inventory and orders, and may face operational disruptions if these systems fail or experience problems.

By identifying and managing these risks, a storekeeper can help to ensure the smooth and efficient operation of the store or warehouse.

What certification ?

There are no specific certification requirements for storekeepers, as the job typically does not require any specific education or training. However, some storekeepers may choose to obtain certifications or qualifications in related areas to improve their skills and enhance their job prospects. Some potential certification options for storekeepers include:

  1. Certificate in Supply Chain Management: This certification, offered by professional organizations such as the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), can provide storekeepers with the knowledge and skills needed to manage supply chain operations and logistics.
  2. Certified Purchasing Manager (CPM): This certification, offered by the Institute for Supply Management (ISM), is designed for professionals involved in the procurement and management of goods and services.
  3. Certified in Production and Inventory Management (CPIM): This certification, offered by the Association for Operations Management (APICS), is designed for professionals involved in the production and inventory management of goods and services.
  4. Certified Supply Chain Professional (CSCP): This certification, offered by the Association for Supply Chain Management (ASCM), is designed for professionals working in the supply chain field and covers topics such as supply chain strategy, design, and implementation.
  5. Six Sigma Green Belt: This certification, offered by various organizations, is designed for professionals who have a role in improving processes and reducing defects and waste.

Obtaining one or more of these certifications can help storekeepers to develop the skills and knowledge needed to excel in their roles and advance their careers.

Data analysis

What about data analysis for a better raw material management ?

Marlon: Hey David, I noticed we’ve been running low on a few of our raw materials lately. Do you have any idea what’s going on?

David (Supply Mnager): Yeah, I’ve been keeping an eye on it. It looks like we’ve been experiencing some shortages due to unexpected demand for our products.

Marlon: That makes sense. But is there anything we can do to prevent these shortages from happening in the future?

David: One thing we could try is using data analysis to more accurately predict demand for our products. That way, we can make sure we have enough raw materials on hand to meet that demand.

Marlon: How would we go about doing that?

David: One tool we could use is called Material Requirements Planning, or MRP. It helps us calculate how much of each raw material we need based on the forecasted demand for our finished products.

Marlon: That sounds useful. How does MRP work exactly?

David: MRP uses data on our current inventory levels, lead times for purchasing raw materials, and production schedules to calculate how much of each raw material we need to have on hand at any given time. It takes into account the amount of raw material used in each product, as well as the lead time it takes to get more material when we run low.

Marlon: That makes a lot of sense. Do you think implementing MRP could help us avoid shortages in the future?

David: Definitely. By using MRP to more accurately predict demand and plan our raw material purchases, we should be able to avoid running out of the materials we need to keep production running smoothly.

Daily Follow-up files

Marlon had been working as a storekeeper in a large manufacturing company for several years. He was responsible for managing the inventory of raw materials, finished products, and spare parts used in the production process. Marlon took pride in his work and was constantly looking for ways to improve the efficiency of the inventory management system.

One day, Marlon noticed that the production team was experiencing shortages of certain spare parts, causing delays in the production process. Marlon decided to investigate the issue by using daily follow-up files to track the inventory levels of the spare parts. He used the data to identify trends and patterns that could help him predict when shortages might occur.

With the help of the data, Marlon was able to identify several factors that were contributing to the part shortages. He discovered that some of the parts were being used more quickly than anticipated, while others were being wasted due to inefficient production processes. Marlon presented his findings to the production team, and they were impressed by his ability to use data to identify the root causes of the shortages.

With Marlon’s help, the production team implemented several changes to improve the inventory management system. They developed more accurate forecasting models, improved vendor management processes, and streamlined the production process to reduce waste and increase efficiency. Marlon continued to use daily follow-up files to monitor inventory levels and to identify any areas that needed further improvement.

As a result of Marlon’s data-driven approach to inventory management, the company was able to reduce part shortages and improve the efficiency of the production process. Marlon’s colleagues praised him for his innovative approach, and he became known as the go-to person for inventory management within the company.

Marlon was happy to have made a significant contribution to the company’s success and was proud of the role he played in helping to improve the inventory management system. He continued to use data analysis and daily follow-up files to identify areas for improvement and to help the company stay ahead of the competition.

KPI

Key process indicators

Here are some potential key performance indicators (KPIs) that a storekeeper might be evaluated on:

  1. Accuracy of inventory records: The storekeeper should be able to accurately track stock levels, including the movement of stock in and out of the store.
  2. On-time delivery: The storekeeper should be able to ensure that orders are fulfilled and delivered on time, as agreed with customers or other stakeholders.
  3. Customer satisfaction: The storekeeper should be able to provide excellent customer service, including promptly fulfilling orders and addressing any customer inquiries or complaints.
  4. Stock turnover rate: The storekeeper should be able to maintain an appropriate level of stock to meet customer demand, without overstocking or running out of stock.
  5. Order accuracy: The storekeeper should be able to accurately fill orders, ensuring that the correct quantities and types of items are provided.
  6. Order processing time: The storekeeper should be able to efficiently process orders, from receipt to fulfillment, in a timely manner.
  7. Inventory accuracy: The storekeeper should be able to accurately maintain stock levels, including conducting regular counts to ensure that inventory records are accurate.
  8. Safety and security: The storekeeper should be able to ensure the safety and security of the store or warehouse, including implementing appropriate safety procedures and following proper handling and storage procedures for hazardous materials.
  9. Compliance with policies and procedures: The storekeeper should be able to follow company policies and procedures, as well as comply with relevant laws and regulations.

By tracking and measuring these KPIs, a storekeeper can ensure that they are meeting the performance expectations of their role and contributing to the overall success of the organization.

Data within SAP

Main SAP screens

  1. Material Master Data: This screen allows storekeepers to view and maintain detailed information about a specific material, including its stock level, unit of measure, and storage location.
  2. Stock Overview: This screen provides an overview of the current stock levels for all materials in the store.
  3. Purchase Order: This screen allows storekeepers to create, view and manage purchase orders for materials and goods needed.
  4. Goods Receipt: This screen is used to record and confirm the receipt of goods from suppliers.
  5. Material Movement: This screen allows storekeepers to record and track material movements within the warehouse, including goods issues, goods receipts, and inventory transfers.
  6. Stock Aging Analysis: This screen provides a visual representation of how long materials have been in stock and how quickly they are moving.
  7. Reservation: This screen allows storekeepers to reserve materials for specific production orders or projects.
  8. Physical Inventory: This screen is used to perform physical inventory counts and reconcile the physical stock levels with the system stock levels.
  9. Stock Requirement List: This screen allows storekeepers to view and manage the stock requirements for all materials in the warehouse.
  10. Reports: This screen provides access to various reports such as inventory turnover, stock aging, and goods receipt/issue history.

Roles of Data for Store Keeper

Importance of daily follow-up files and data analysis

Inventory management is a crucial aspect of any business, especially in manufacturing industries where raw materials, components, and finished products are integral to the production process. To ensure that inventory is properly managed, storekeepers need to keep track of inventory levels, monitor usage patterns, and forecast future needs. One effective way of doing this is through the use of daily follow-up files.

Daily follow-up files are a set of documents that storekeepers use to track inventory levels on a daily basis. These files can be used to monitor the inflow and outflow of inventory, identify trends and patterns, and forecast future needs. By using daily follow-up files, storekeepers can ensure that inventory is always available when it is needed, which can help to improve the efficiency of the production process.

One of the main benefits of using daily follow-up files is that they help to identify inventory shortages before they become a problem. By tracking inventory levels on a daily basis, storekeepers can identify trends and patterns that can help them predict when shortages might occur. This allows them to take proactive measures to prevent shortages, such as ordering additional inventory or adjusting production schedules.

Daily follow-up files can also be used to monitor usage patterns and identify areas where inventory is being wasted. By tracking inventory levels and usage patterns, storekeepers can identify areas where inventory is being used inefficiently or where excess inventory is being held. This allows them to take corrective action to reduce waste, which can help to improve the company’s bottom line.

Another benefit of using daily follow-up files is that they help to improve communication and coordination between different departments within the company. By sharing daily follow-up files with other departments, storekeepers can ensure that everyone is aware of inventory levels and needs. This can help to improve communication and coordination between departments, which can lead to better decision-making and improved efficiency.

In conclusion, daily follow-up files are an essential tool for storekeepers in any manufacturing industry. They help to ensure that inventory is properly managed, shortages are identified before they become a problem, waste is minimized, and communication and coordination between departments is improved. By using daily follow-up files, storekeepers can help to improve the efficiency of the production process, reduce costs, and increase the company’s overall profitability.